Inside the head of a designer


Create Debate
Create:Debate

Create:Debate

I’ve been putting together a final show for the Masters in Design Innovation I have just about finished.  On Monday I handed in my thesis and this Monday I will be presenting the work to examiners.  It has been a really tough year balancing everything and I’m really happy to invite you all to Create Debate: A design Innovation symposium at the Glasgow School of Art.  You can sign up here.

Presentations;

Professor Irene Mcara Mcwilliams will open with an introduction
Professor Mike Press, Associate Dean of Design, Duncan of Jordanstone College of Art and Design, University of Dundee, will discuss ‘Design as an affirmation of values’
Jim Fleming, Director at Wider Aspect Innovation ltd, will discuss Some learnings on Innovation Best Practice
David Hicks,
Managing Director of Border Crossing will discuss The new economic context – from resources to resourcefulness’
Stuart Bailey, Product Design tutor at the Glasgow School of art will discuss changes in design education

Innovative Idea Generation:mixing user value,design and higher education by Joe Slavick
Intergeneration and technology by Basako Okay
Listening to locals: A user centered approach to rural retailing by Laura Franzini
Brand DNA – Does employing social media tactics enhance or risk brand development by Amy Marsh
Effective Collaboration in Multi-disciplinary Teams by Angela Fernandez Orviz
Follow Me!: Mapping the city with user generated contents by Heji Jeong
Improving connections in textile recycling by Sara Pateraki
Embedding design in the public sector and changing our thinking by Sarah Drummond



Embedding design interviews

Embedding design interviews

Embedding design interviews

I’ve been a bit quiet as I’m blogging away on a closed platform, I’m not allowed to share everything I’m up to, but I can cross post occasionally.

I’ve been doing a round of interviews/chats with some fantastic people and just wanted to summarise who I’ve met so far.  This is a thank you from me for all your time and knowledge!

The topics ranged from how to embed design in organisations, how project teams might work, encouraging a culture of innovation, systems thinking, meta design, and reflection on what makes up a designer, to name but a few.

Below is a selection of interviews completed so far;

Dr Anne Marie Mcewan (The Smart Work Company)

Nick Marsh (Side Kick studios)

John Wood (Goldsmiths, Meta Design)

Joel Bailey (Capita)

Ruth Kennedy (professional agitator of too many things to mention, but all great)

Ingrid Koeler (IDeA)

Tess Raine (Design Council)

Emily Campbell (RSA)

Matt Currie (Divergent)

I will be disseminating these over the coming week and pulling out useful case studies and advice for how to embed design in organisations.  And meeting some new (and old) faces next week in London.

I’m free (ish) next Monday to Wednesday if anyone is around for a drink.



Coten Project

Snook are talking about service design and education as special guests this week on the Coten Project.  Andy Polaine asked myself and Lauren as both service design practitioners and myself still being a student to give our perspective on service design education.

The Coten project is a collborative online research activity exploring service design in higher education for 2010 and will see a whole range of different special guests writing essays/creating podcasts/being interviewed and discussing this topic.  The guests are then to answer a week’s worth of questions and engage in discussion with the 100 participants.

Looking forward to the questions and hopefully you enjoy the video, let us know what you think.



Embedding design (why don’t you have a go?)

 

 

There’s an event taking place as I write this, from my ‘borrowed’ desk at Skills Development Scotland, that I rather wish I’d been able to attend.  Snook received an email last month inviting us to an expert seminar being held by RSA Design & Society, unfortunately we can’t make it because of work commitments.

They are bringing together experts and people who have experience in design management, service design, and people working from the inside.  Speakers include Ben Reason from Live Work, Lucy Kimbell who writes the excellent blog, Design leads us where exactly?  and Simon Roberts of Intel and the Ideas Bazaar on embedded anthropology and social science.  Not to mention my boss here at SDS, Tony Coultas, commenting on our experiences so far.

Emily Campbell, who heads up the design and society team wrote a blog post on ‘In-house or out: embedding design’, summing up many of my thoughts.

It is time we see designers switching from outside consultancy to in-house design team, and I don’t just mean a team that designs the company’s ‘look’.  It’s time we saw design teams operating at the heart of organisations.

I’ve been working with Skills Development Scotland since September and am about to embark on a larger piece of work for them, designing a toolkit for frontline staff.  But it’s the structure of the organisation that needs to be designed in tangent.  If you supply people with a design toolkit to ‘see’ things differently and start generating ideas for frontline service delivery and internal operations, you need to support this.

Since being here, I’ve noticed a need for everything to be designed, even down to the last word on a project initiation document.  For example, I recall reading a document that used terms like, ‘how can we mitigate this circumstance’ and ‘how can we terminate this operation without lasting damage’?   

Through some research I did at the beginning of September last year, I found a majority of service designers turning out to be ENFJs.

ENFJ (Extraversion, iNtuition, Feeling, Judgment) is an abbreviation used in the publications of the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) to refer to one of sixteen personality types.[1] The MBTI assessment was developed from the work of prominent psychiatrist Carl G. Jung in his book Psychological Types. Jung proposed a psychological typology based on the theories of cognitive functions that he developed through his clinical observations.”

This is research at some stage I’d like to push further into, I’ve always been fascinated a bit by the way we are, our personalities and the choices we make, and a book I dabbled in recently, ‘The challenge of change in organisations’, has spurred this interest even further.

 

In short, designers are ‘positive optimists’, I found myself (an ENFJ incase you’re wondering) asking, could we change, ‘how can we mitigate this circumstance’ to ‘can we find a way to solve this wicked problem?’.  Witnessing a lecture last year by John Wood from Goldsmiths, I was fascinated by his description of designers being able to make the ‘unimaginable possible’ and working towards ‘attainable utopias’.  I will save all this for another blog post, but google meta design and go exploring, I’m still trying to get my head round it all.

In an organisation of over 1300 people, change in an organisation is going to be a massive challenge, and you need a positive mindset to want to tackle it.  I’m looking forward to my next batch of work kicking off and dealing with the small and larger picture of SDS.  How can you embed design thinking into an organisation so large?  How can you envisage and implement new processes and ways of doing things?

As Emily points out, this new type of embedded design teams have been described as Service Designers.  Why?  My take is that service designers have the skills and tools necessary to bring the intangible to life.

Like myself, Emily asks some key questions, the language barrier I feel to be the most critical,

“In practical terms, what is the job description for an in-house designer with a holistic brief? How does an organisation intent on embedding design go about recruiting designers? How is the effectiveness of staff designers paid for their holistic view to be measured? How does the design of services, structures and strategy respond to cost-benefit analysis? How is the language barrier between designers and other specialists to be overcome? How are creativity and innovation to be managed within large and often cautious or risk-averse organisations?”

In practical terms for Skills Development Scotland, it’s a ‘service designer’ and I dare you to take up the challenge.

They are advertising for a 10 month position to join the service innovation team, go on, try something new and get in touch.



Peachy Keachy

A short post to say thank you to everyone who came along to the Pecha Kucha event at the Glasgow School of art.  Not an official PK, so now nicknamed Peacky Keachy, it was a free event with the goal of encouraging cross departmental discussion and way to highlight all the great work that’s been done around the school.

My favourite thing someone said to me afterwards was I didn’t know service design existed.  They did however, see a way we could work together, so I feel the event did it’s job and lots of interesting discussion followed.  My Peachy Keachy followed the theme of ‘what the hell happened in the last ten months?’.  I started with a picture of my graduation party when I delivered boxes of pink ‘free’ donated drink for our degree show to revellers on the street.  Following through with what service design is (in about 20 seconds) to Snook and Mypolice.

Thanks again to all the speakers, you were all fantastic.

And to round off, we will run another one.  We had quite a few people approach us and ask if they could do one next time round. Perfect!

To continue the discussion, cme and join the hub and the group so we can plan the next one.

Hats off to Neil Mcguire and Christine Kinnear who presented but were involved in the planning, (and mega last minute rush) to pull everything together.  For a good write up of the event, check out Christina’s blog.



GSA Hub
March 2, 2010, 10:17 pm
Filed under: Masters in Design Innovation

Myself, Neil Mcguire and Penny Anderson attempted at the start of my masters to get an online network going to get more cross collaboration and people talking around the art school, because in my experience, it’s pretty fragmented at the best of times.

I’ve always felt the most interesting conversations happened between myself and other disciplines, we can learn alot from each other, especially when we work and operate in different worlds.  That’s why we set up gsahub, with its umbrella here which houses blogs from around the art school which we are slowly collecting.  And slow it has been, we’ve not particularly had the time to push it, but it’s organically growing, and we want it to get bigger and better.

Above is a photo taken from Alex Ostrowski, who set up the Yellow Revolution at UWE, Bristol.  He says,

“In my second year of university I became frustrated with the lack of creative interaction between students on different courses. In collaboration with a like-minded illustrator, Hattie Newman, we instigated an open collective by the name of The Yellow Revolution, intended to facilitate and showcase interdisciplinary creative collaboration amongst UWE students.”

Now to be fair to our gsahub, we’ve not gone to the lengths and got the yellow paint out, but our intentions are there and we’re excited about our event!

And so to launch it, we are going to hold a Pecha Kucha event, and joining the organisational team is Christina Kinnear. Students past and present will come armed with 20 slides, each timed at 20 seconds to present their work and lives on April 22nd at 5.30pm inside the staff lounge of ‘Where the Monkey Sleeps’.

Tickets are limited so sign yourself up, and come join us on the hub, or join in on twitter using the #gsahub.



Getgo wins Audi competition

Getgo Probe Tools

Well what an exciting week!

Getgoglasgow, which is the design collective of the two Masters courses at the Glasgow school of art (Design Innovation and European design) won the Audi Sustain our Nation competition and £10000 for the community we worked with.

We’ve been working with an area in Maryhill Glasgow called Wyndford to develop a sustainable social enterprise for their community.  The project has been tough, with some great highs, and almighty lows.

For the group, it was a challenging project.  This demanded a new role of the designer away from the solo author to the co-creator.  We made it really clear at the beginning of the project to work with people rather than for them.

View this document on Scribd

The winning project was Green Gorillaz, a way to bring back community spirit and the community voice, using offline and online message boards, linked up  by residents.  We created some seed groups which will house events and see knowledge transferred across generations.  It stems from the closure of their primary schools last year, and a real loss of community.  They had come together to fight the decision, so we knew there were passionate local champs.  We wanted to harness this and turn that energy into something positive.

But credit should go to everyone involved in the project, there were three projects developed from the same process. We held co-creation workshops with residents and stakeholders to generate ideas to take forward, but made sure at all points we were transparent and open about our process, returning to the community regularly to work with them again and develop proposals.

If design education should learn anything from this, is that building relationships takes time, and if projects like this are to be handed to students, proper training in community work, sustainable thinking and an understanding of ethics should be taught.  We’ve struggled with the competition and institute deadlines.  For example, after handing in the first three projects, we had to wait to see whether any had made it through to the regional finals.  At this point, we decided as a collective to carry all of them on anyway, even though none might be taken forward.

Anyway, we’re down at the RSA on the 17th February to represent a ‘developed’ concept (we’re working to make it real and it starts tomorrow with a football pitch party at 10am where we’ll be feeding back to the community), and hopefully we can win another £10000 for Wyndford.

In the words of John Gray yesterday,

“bloody good for u……bunnets in the air !……mon the weegies :-)”




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